Bienvenido(a) a Crisis Energética viernes, 07 mayo 2021 @ 09:42 CEST

Crisis Energética Foros

Petróleo e inflación en el crecimiento energético


Estado: desconectado

Daniel

Site Admin
Admin
Identificado: 03/10/2003
Mensajes: 1995
Dice el tópico que cuando el petróleo sube, otras alternativas energéticas, incluido el petróleo "caro" se vuelve rentable. Y es cierto, hasta cierto punto. Llega un momento que el petróleo empuja hacia arriba los costes de las materias primas, de manera que ciertos recursos siempre se quedan a unas decenas de dólares de ser rentables. Y esto vale tanto para el petróleo como para las renovables. Y eso sin hablar de las cuentas energéticas, esas que nos aseguran que, técnicamente, el petróleo nunca se agotará, y bien cierto que es, ya que dejará de ser una fuente energética para convertirse en un pozo...

Y es que el gigante tiene los pies de petróleo... y antes de cambiarle de zapatos habrá que tenerlo muy en cuenta.

Para muestra un botón, del conocido diario de izquierda catastrofista The Wall Street Journal:

Biofuel Costs Hurt Effort To Curb Oil Price
By PATRICK BARTA
November 5, 2007; Page A2

Rising costs of biofuels and other alternative energies are making them less viable as substitutes for crude oil, a development that could frustrate efforts to bring oil prices down in the years ahead.

A few years ago, many energy economists predicted that higher oil prices would ensure the success of alternative energies such as biodiesel or wind power by making them more financially attractive. In many cases, though, the opposite has occurred: Even as crude-oil prices approach $100 a barrel, some alternatives look less attractive than in the past.

It's all relative: Some alternative fuels look less attractive than in the past because of a sharp rise in raw-materials costs.

One example: Crude oil would now have to be $130 a barrel before palm-oil-based biodiesel was competitive.

Not just crops: Costs of uranium for nuclear power and silicon for solar-power cells are up, too. One reason: Energy demand is now so intense that supplies of just about every kind of fuel are in short supply, driving up prices of the raw materials involved in making many alternative energies. Some biofuels also rely on agricultural commodities that already are facing higher demand as foodstuffs, a situation which drives up prices further.



The problem is most acute for crop-based alternative fuels, like ethanol and biodiesel, though it has also proved true to some degree for solar power, nuclear power and other competing energy sources.

Biodiesel, a fuel made from farm crops like soybean oil and palm oil, was in some cases supposed to be economically competitive with crude-oil prices as low as $50 a barrel, according to analysts who studied the industry.

But a sharp rise in the price of biodiesel raw materials -- including a more than 90% jump in palm-oil prices over the past three years -- has dramatically altered the economics of the industry. M.R. Chandran, former head of the Malaysian Palm Oil Association, says crude oil would now have to be as much as $130 a barrel before palm-oil-based biodiesel is competitive.

Other alternatives to oil, including relatively dirty ones such as coal, have also become more expensive. Coal prices have more than doubled over the past four years, and prices for uranium, a crucial ingredient in nuclear power, have increased more than sevenfold in that time frame. The cost of solar-power cells has been pushed up in the past few years by a tight supply of silicon, the main raw material in such cells.


"The cost goal posts have certainly shifted," and that is making it harder for alternatives to oil to gain traction, says Peter Tertzakian, chief energy economist with ARC Financial Corp., a Calgary, Alberta, private-equity investor. As a result, "the rate of adoption that people expected is going to be a lot slower than people think."

Of course, many types of alternative energy have made considerable progress over the past three years, and crude-oil prices would almost certainly be higher now if such fuels weren't in the mix. Asia and other parts of the world have rolled out billions of dollars for new nuclear-power plants and liquefied-natural-gas facilities over the past several years, and spending on solar and wind power also has soared.

Global ethanol production rose 25% from 2004 to 13.5 billion gallons last year, and biodiesel capacity more than doubled to 6.1 million metric tons in that period, though the two combined still only make up about 1% of the world's transportation-fuel supply. Biofuels -- along with oil from the former Soviet Union and Brazil -- are expected to account for much of the new energy supply developed outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries next year, the International Energy Agency says.

Perhaps most important, huge sums of venture-capital cash have flooded into the alternative-energy sector since 2004, raising the odds that technological advances will bring down costs in the years ahead.

"It's early in the game; it's only been four years since energy prices have risen, and I think we're all just too impatient," says Mark Zandi, the chief economist of Moody's Economy.com, a West Chester, Pa., research firm.

Still, the latest surge in alternative-energy costs -- along with growing concerns about their environmental sustainability -- are forcing governments to rethink their commitment to such fuels. Some have begun to question whether they will play as big a role in the future as first hoped.

In Malaysia, an important center for palm-oil biodiesel production, the government has held back on plans to require biodiesel blends at petrol stations because of a fear it could drive palm-oil prices too high, imperiling the country's nascent biodiesel industry.

Malaysia issued roughly 90 permits for biodiesel refineries in the past three years, but only about five are in operation. It appears that most of the others will remain on hold until palm-oil prices come back down.

In Europe, officials are still committed to a plan to meet 10% of the region's transportation needs with biofuels by 2020. But Germany has cut back on some tax incentives for biofuels, and some EU officials have questioned whether subsidies for biofuel crops are necessary in the future. Spanish energy company Abengoa SA recently suspended production at one of its biofuel facilities in Spain because of high grain prices. Similar projects have stalled elsewhere, including Hungary.

The U.S. has its own alternative-fuel woes. The price of corn, a key raw ingredient, has increased even as the market price for ethanol has been held down by oversupply. That has squeezed the profitability of ethanol producers and forced new players to cancel or delay construction of more facilities.

Some economists now fear that the current problems may remain as long as oil stays expensive and won't be easily fixed in the short term. They note that some nonoil fuels face the same supply constraints as crude oil. There may not be enough land or water to produce all the crops needed to keep biofuel prices low. Coal, while still plentiful, faces deteriorating grades and rising costs in older mines. Uranium supply is limited by the long lead times required in developing new mines, among other factors.

Another concern is that as more nonoil commodities evolve into oil alternatives, they will start to be priced the same way as crude, keeping their costs in line with international oil prices.

Before the latest energy boom, for instance, palm oil was viewed primarily as a source of cooking oil, and its value didn't rise and fall with crude oil. Now, it is increasingly seen as an energy source. Over the past three years, palm oil's price has risen by roughly the same amount as crude oil.

But there are signs some of these fears may be overblown. The price of sugar, a key element of ethanol, has dropped more than 40% since early 2006 as supply expands in places such as India.

Estado: desconectado

Víctor

Forum User
Miembro activo
Identificado: 18/03/2004
Mensajes: 1319
Increíble artículo, sabiendo de dónde proviene. Está bastante claro, aunque aún no para todos, sí para una creciente minoría de analistas. Resulta que al final nos van a tener que mirar de otra manera. Incluso los economistas más ortodoxos van a empezar a temblar, a temerse que igual no va a ser seguro su mundo feliz de crecimiento sin fin. Parece que, al menos algunos economistas, ya prestan atención a cosas que nos son tan familiares aquí, cosas que quedaban muy lejos de sus esquemas. Por ejemplo:

"Some economists now fear that the current problems may remain as long as oil stays expensive and won't be easily fixed in the short term. They note that some nonoil fuels face the same supply constraints as crude oil. There may not be enough land or water to produce all the crops needed to keep biofuel prices low. Coal, while still plentiful, faces deteriorating grades and rising costs in older mines. Uranium supply is limited by the long lead times required in developing new mines, among other factors."

Y salen otros signos inequívocos en el artículo: "concern", "question", "problem", "held back", "suspended", "delay", "lot slower", "raw material" (!), "sharp rise", "dramatically", "the opposite has occurred", "less attractive than in the past", "lees viable", "frustrate efforts", etc. En fin, una muestra de por dónde van los derroteros ante la escalada de precios del petróleo y, por simpatía, prácticamente todo lo demás, incluidas las energías alternativas que, en teoría para ellos, debían sacarnos del pozo sin fondo al que de manera temeraria nos estamos asomando.

Resulta que ("now fear") ahora temen. Tienen miedo. Ahora. ¿Por qué ahora y no antes? Porque siempre es más fácil decir qué ha pasado que decir qué pasará. Los economistas de siempre se preocupan, y ahora, porque únicamente la "señal" de los precios les mueve. Nada es más importante. Pues parece que van a tener que ver muchas señales en los próximos años. A ver si entre señal y señal y bajo el duro golpe de los hechos cae más de un economista de la higuera maldiciendo a su dios (me refiero al mercado, claro).

Con el aplazamiento del umbral de rentabilidad desde los 50$ a los 130$ en el ejemplo de aceite de palma está visto que conforme suba el precio del petróleo en el mercado internacional los precios de las otras alternativas tendrán la misma tendencia y dejarán poco a poco de ser alternativas rentables para ser alternativas ruinosas, con lo que la diferencia entre lo malo y lo peor será semejante. Así pues, ¿por qué optar por las alternativas? No va a ser rentable. La economía quiere rentabilidad, pero no es ya tan segura. Así pues, ¿es posible que esa pretendida rentabilidad no sea nunca alcanzada? Como si al caminar hacia el objetivo, éste se distanciara de nosotros al mismo tiempo. Es como la eficiencia, nunca aplaca el crecimiento de la demanda, simpre va por detrás persiguiéndola. El proceso inflacionario se ha puesto en marcha catapultado por la problemática deficiencia energética del sistema económico, y no se ve a la vista un alto en la carrera alcista. De ahí que resulte áún más evidente que en el pasado la relación precios-disponibilidad energética.

¿Qué paso seguirán ahora los economistas que se han dado cuenta del "fear" (temor) que suscita esta situación? ¿Habrá una especie de "Reforma", de "cisma" entre ortodoxos y revisionistas, entre puros y herejes? Quién sabe.


Un saludo
Víctor
Sistemas más complejos, mayor flujo de energía

Estado: desconectado

Daniel

Site Admin
Admin
Identificado: 03/10/2003
Mensajes: 1995
Y esta tampoco tiene desperdicio, la fuente es Platts, y muestra cómo las petroleras privadas (IOCs) no pueden compensar su extracción con la adición de nuevas reservas y su producción va cayendo (de hecho desde 2004 entraron en su peak oil particular). Evidentemente, otras condiciones en Irak, Irán y Venezuela podrían hacer cambiar las cosas, pero por qué ya cada vez quedan menos regiones provechosas y tenemos que recurrir a lo mismo de siempre (OPEP, petróleo no convencional, territorios frontera)?

La respuesta es clara: los nuevos descubrimientos no compensan la caída de la base productiva existente y los mejores premios (Cheney dixit) ya solo están en manos de las compañías nacionales (NOCs), que jugarán al juego del mercado libre solo si creen que les va a beneficiar a medio y largo plazo.

High prices don’t alter majors’ output fall

Third-quarter liquids production off 6% at 7 big companies

Houston—The peak oil debate attracted new data to consider November 2 as a Platts survey showed third-quarter global production of oil liquids at seven key publicly traded international majors declined 6% from last year, with output down 664,000 b/d at a time when some officials are calling for increased production from OPEC.

But the implications appear more complicated than indicated by the raw numbers, with the largest producer, ExxonMobil, citing theimpact of reduced shares of actual production from African entitlements for its 4% downturn in the quarter. Excluding those special factors, ExxonMobil said its liquids output actually would have risen 3%.

Still, peak oil enthusiasts took note, with Charles Maxwell, the senior oil analyst for Weeden & Company, warning that the downturn simply underscores fundamental changes afoot that the major producers want to ignore.

“They can’t tell you why this is happening,” said Maxwell, a noted peak oil lecturer and observer. “It’s like a tennis player who can’t explain why he is losing to someone he has beaten all the time. They haven’t figured it out.”

He said he is surprised to see the decline emerging in production data earlier than he had expected, and predicted the implications include continued rising oil prices.

Besides ExxonMobil, the Platts review focused only on liquids production comparisons for integrated majors BP, Shell, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Eni and Marathon Oil. It determined those companies reported collective liquids output of 10,338,000 b/d for the quarter ended September 30, down from 11,002,000 b/d in the same period a year ago.

Liquids production fell at six of the seven companies and stood flat at Chevron, leaving Barclay’s Capital analyst Paul Horsnell to question the ability of the international oil companies to respond to increasing demand and pricing.

“Barclays Capital has taken a very deadbeat view on non-OPEC supply growth in recent years, mainly due to our view that the rate of decline in mature fields was being underestimated by consensus,” said Horsnell, responding by email from London to questions.

He added: “The weakness appears consistent to us with what has been a long period of output underperformance.”

In a short report October 31, Horsnell had noted a 9% decline at Shell and wrote: “To announce a 9% fall in crude oil output and then put higher prices down not to any fundamentals but to speculation does seem a little strange to us.”

Horsnell wrote: “After years of rising prices, the announcement by a major oil company that field decline rates were enough to counteract all of the accumulated supply response to higher prices and were at the heart of a large crude oil output reduction, might be seen as a further signal that prices have not yet been bid up enough.”

He added that recognition of weakness in non-OPEC output might underscore the view that continued price increases are justified. And he challenged remarks from Shell CFO Peter Voser attributing higher crude prices to speculation and politics.

“The entire crude oil price curve has been on a march upwards for several years,” wrote Horsnell. “To see that long and consistent process as the result of speculation and some indefinable so-called political premium does not seem a sustainable position in our view.”

John Felmy, the chief economist for the American Petroleum Institute, cited three factors he believes might be responsible for some of the decline: rising costs of production, the transfer of producing properties from the majors to independents, and a concentration in recent years in production of natural gas instead of oil. But he also said he wanted to review the specific numbers for a more detailed reaction.

Representatives from the companies, besides ExxonMobil, were not immediately available to offer elaborations focused specifically on liquids output.
The review comes just four months after a study by analysts at Bear Sterns revealed that 2006 marked the third consecutive year in which the major oil companies failed to fully replace production with a combined reserves replacement ratio of just 91% (ON 6/22).

“Reserve bookings and production growth go hand in hand,” Bear Sterns analyst Nicole Decker said. “We are just not seeing enough new production.” And it emerges as the industry debates OPEC’s future role in meeting demand as oil prices continued to rise (ON 11/1).

Localized factors may explain some of the decline, the specific company reports indicate. ExxonMobil, for example, suffered a 14% decline in third-quarter liquids production from Africa, which also ranks as its top producing region with 27% of total production. Citing the impact of mature field declines and lower entitlements, the company noted in its earnings announcement that liquids production actually rose 3% excluding the impact of entitlements, divestments, OPEC quota effects and Venezuela.

ExxonMobil represented 25% of the total liquids output by the seven companies in the review with 2.5 million b/d, down from 2.6 million b/d a year ago. “It’s not like the oil was not produced, our share is reduced,” said ExxonMobil spokesman Alan Jeffers.

Across the board, ExxonMobil’s liquids output fell 4%, as a 9% decline in Europe and a 1.3% decline in the US joined the African downturn to balance gains of 5.6% in Canada, 5% in Asia Pacific-Middle East and 42% in the Russia-Caspian region, where output of 178,000 b/d represented just 7% of the major’s total.

Analyst Maxwell challenged that the major oil companies must adjust to new industry dynamics that include control of most reserves by national oil companies and the geological realities of a dwindling resource base (ON 3/5). He said the majors continue to focus more on their share prices than on the difficulties of finding new resources, rejecting opportunities that appear unable to provide less than a 20% return in an era of rising costs.

“They are using criteria designed to make them fail,” Maxwell said. “The criteria is like setting the high jump bar at 10 feet.

They aren’t going to invest a lot of money because they can’t find the projects to show a rate of return. So they are just going to sit.”

Estado: desconectado

hemp

Forum User
Miembro activo
Identificado: 30/03/2004
Mensajes: 1341
Es de cajón, si el petróleo barrato es la sangre del sistema, si encarecé todo encarece. NO hace falta hablar con Rappel en adivinar eso :)

El lobo esta en la puerta, y desde hace mucho tiempo estaba alli, es que ahora no ven un perro gris, si no el lobo :)
El chollo se acaba y ver que hacemos...

Estado: desconectado

Juanjo

Forum User
Miembro activo
Identificado: 18/01/2006
Mensajes: 146
Todo eso es imposible, porque ya dijo el premio nobel de economía Julian Simon que, en un libre mercado, los recursos naturales son ilimitados. Que no se enteran. Miren lo que dicen los muchachos del Instituto Juan de Mariana:

¡enlace erróneo!

Estado: desconectado

Franz_Copenhague

Forum User
Miembro activo
Identificado: 28/02/2007
Mensajes: 832
Las cosas ponen feas cuando en la bolsa se dicen la verdad...

¡enlace erróneo!

Les falta decir que se acaba el chorro pero bueee... (Aqui no pasa ná esto es temporal)
Las desgracias no llegan Solas

Estado: desconectado

youky

Forum User
Miembro activo
Identificado: 26/02/2007
Mensajes: 147
Que la subida del petróleo traerá una subida de precios es lógico, lo que no sabemos es si se trata de inflación pura y dura, esto es, subir precios sin subir sueldos, o estamos camino de una economía inflacionista donde simplemente el dinero ira perdiendo valor progresivamente a medida que la inflación y los sueldos suban dos dígitos anuales.

Intentare analizar varios supuestos económicos posibles.

Supuesto 1: la economía se hunde porque toca fin de ciclo capitalista y se necesita un reseteo del sistema.
Las inyecciones monetarias que se han recibido de la FED y el BCE van directamente a valores especulativos de las bolsas con el objetivo de relanzar el consumo en los países desarrollados mediante el crédito fácil y barato.
Cuando tengan las redes llenas en la bolsa y la gente entrampada de por vida, hundirán el barco y solventaran la crisis que sigue al viejo estilo, guerras y energía barata, robar petróleo en todo el planeta. Mientras, el público a sufrir un par de generaciones.

Supuesto 2: La economía conoce y siente el peak, el petróleo barato se ha acabado. Los gurús de la bolsa dicen “no future” y se lanzan al canibalismo capitalista que consiste básicamente en imprimir dinero sin ninguna base sostenible y perpetuar por unos años una orgía consumista final que durara mientras que los mercados aguanten. ¿Qué el petróleo se dispara? Se inflaciona el sistema para pagarlo con papel basura.
En este segundo supuesto el daño al sistema es mortal, a largo plazo el dinero deja de tener valor y los conflictos mundiales se generalizan.

Supuesto 3: planto un nabo en mi huerta y me encuentro un depósito 6 veces mas grande que Ghawar, fin del problema, y de mis problemas.

Estado: desconectado

Daniel

Site Admin
Admin
Identificado: 03/10/2003
Mensajes: 1995
Youki, no creo que hablemos de "esa inflación", no es cuestión del dinero y su valor, sino de que el petróleo interviene directamente en la extracción de petróleo y en la construcción, instalación y mantenimiento de otras infraestructuras de generación, almacenamiento y transporte energético.

Lo que pase a partir de ahí ya poco tiene que ver con la ciencia y la técnica, aunque después de todo, la inflación monetaria no será irrelevante.

Estado: desconectado

Víctor

Forum User
Miembro activo
Identificado: 18/03/2004
Mensajes: 1319

¡enlace erróneo!

Supongo que si alguien hubiera apostado en el año 2000 que ahora tendríamos esta gráfica de precios, hubiera ganado sin duda. Esta es una gráfica que vendría a resumir qué sucede cuando sólo se piensa dejar al mercado a su "libre albedrío". Esto me recuerda a cierta apuesta de un tal Julian Simon, que puede verse explicada en este artículo que, de verdad, no tiene desperdicio (ya colgado antes) Abundancia sin límites

"Los datos recopilados por Simon le hicieron ver a él en primer lugar, y a toda una generación de economistas más tarde, que las teorías maltusianas no se sostienen. El convencimiento de Simon era tan alto que ofreció a quien quisiera aceptar una apuesta. Estaba seguro de que cualquier materia prima bajaría de precio si se elige un período suficientemente largo, respondiendo a la tendencia de los recursos a ser más abundantes y no más escasos"; "(...) cinco materias primas (cobre, cromo, níquel, aluminio y tungsteno); la evolución de sus precios pasados diez años determinaría el resultado de la apuesta. Se jugaron 10.000 dólares, 2.000 por cada una de las materias primas, y el biólogo Ehrlich declaró que aceptaba. En las propias palabras de Julian Simon: “En el momento fijado de septiembre de 1990 no sólo la suma de los precios, sino también el precio de cada metal individual, habían caído."

Por cierto, el artículo dice muchas barbaridades, como: "Un reciente artículo, titulado ‘Wordly Wealth’, concluye que una población de 9.000 millones de personas que tuvieran el estilo de vida de los ricos de hoy sería sostenible y no dañaría el medio ambiente". No, no, qué va; no es ningún extraterrestre el que escribe: es un ser de este planeta. Y se queda tan fresco. Y lo pone al final, en sus jugosas "conclusiones". Ya vemos qué futuro tan feliz nos espera con esta buena gente en el poder. Bueno, quien quiera leerlo, ya sabe.

Digo yo que quizá la cosas tan "nuevas" que dicen estos señores respetables (dentro de lo que cabe) se tendrían que actualizar un poco, ¿no?


Pero, ahora veamos no los datos de 1970 o 1990, sino los datos de esta década. Ahí es donde empieza lo interesante.

Aquí el último informe del World Bank sobre todo tipo de materias primas y sus precios promedio anuales:
Commodity price data. enero 2005 a octubre 2007. World Bank

Interesante el comparar las subidas en la inmensa mayoría de materiales, en clara divergencia con esa "buena gente" que nos pone ejemplos de hace varias décadas. ¿Que sólo son dos años y medio? Por suerte, me guardé los datos del mismo informe, pero desde enero 2002 a julio 2004 (lástima que en la web del World Bank ya no aparezca el enlace).

Puedo asegurar que si entonces cojo esos cinco años (aproximados) y comparo los datos de enero de 2002 y octubre de 2007 las subidas son constantes en todos los materiales (por supuesto, si cabe descontar la inflación queda aún mucho margen de subida "inaudita"). El infome más antiguo ya lo comenté en algún sitio de la web.

Por ejemplo:

Voy a escoger los mismos metales por los que el buen Simon apostó (que bajarían de precio): cobre, cromo, níquel, aluminio y tungsteno. La primera cifra es la de 2002 y la segunda de octubre de 2007:

Cobre ($/tonelada): 1,559 - 7,186 (x 4,6)
Cromo (no hay datos en los informes)
Níquel ($/tonelada): 6,772 - 39,016 (x 5,7)
Aluminio ($/tonelada): 1,350 - 2,677 (x 1,9)
Tungsteno (no hay datos en los informes)

Bien, ya podemos, si procede, descontar la inflación. Las subidas (ver cómo se multiplica el precio), ¿no son igualmente grandes?

Y todo esto en cinco años. ¿Es ciertamente significativo? ¿no? ¿Y si extrapolamos un poco los datos a diez años? Total, puede cogerse la calculadora y ... ¿Que eso da miedo? ¿No estamos creciendo al 3%-4% anual a nivel mundial sin que nos tiemble el consumo?

Puede que al buen Simon ya no le apeteciera tanto jugar en estos tiempos que corren.

Haría bien; creo que esta vez perdería hasta la corbata.



Un saludo
Víctor
Sistemas más complejos, mayor flujo de energía

Estado: desconectado

Dario_Ruarte

Forum User
Miembro activo
Identificado: 23/09/2005
Mensajes: 999
Este tema ya se los había comentado hablando de los costos en el biodiesel de soja.

Cuando empecé a analizar los primeros planes de negocio y sus supuestos económicos no advertí (al igual que quienes lo hicieron) este fenómeno y por lo tanto se daba por "supuesto" que el PRECIO de la soja era el DE ESA FECHA con, a lo sumo, correcciones de inflación.

Pero, a poco de pensarlo advertí que NINGUN PRODUCTOR iba a REGALAR su grano !!

Y, si TODOS querían comprar para hacer biodiesel, el PUNTO DE EQUILIBRIO estaría dado por el PRODUCTO SUSTITUTO que era, ni más ni menos, el PROPIO PETROLEO.

Cuando empecé a hacer notar este hecho (en realidad el que se lleva la RENTA DIFERENCIAL es el productor del grano y no el que produce biodiesel) muchos de los "expertos" no me lo querían creer... pero era TAN EVIDENTE que al poco tiempo lo aceptaron.

Eso si, no dijeron nada a sus "inversores" o, al ver las nuevas curvas de rentabilidad y recupero del capital, las plantas no se instalaban.

Obviamente el fenómeno, ni bien te colocas el chip en la cabeza es EVIDENTE.

Antes, con el uso del aceite SOLO para consumo humano o animal, la producción tenía como precio de referencia los productos SUSTITUTOS (otros aceites, en definitiva el equilibrio estaba dado por el precio del aceite de girasol, maiz, soja, palma, oliva, etc.)

Pero, cuando la demanda la manejaban los COMBUSTIBLES el precio de referencia se fijaba contra el de su producto sustituto que era, ni más ni menos, que el propio PETROLEO.

Riqueza para los PRODUCTORES, vuelta al siglo XVIII !!!!

:-)

Pero, esta "riqueza para el productor" no es sólo para los productores agrícolas... Ustedes SABEN que el costo de producir muchos barriles de petróleo sigue estando en torno a los U$S 7-11 por barril... pero su precio de venta excede los U$S 90.

No es un aumento de "costos de producción" es un "aumento basado en demanda" y esto lleva SIEMPRE a que suba la renta del productor.

===

Esto con los aceites... en el caso de los metales entiendo que no se trata de "productos sustitutos" que alteran su punto de equilibrio sino:

a) Aumentos en costos de producción

b) Aumento de demanda (China, India)

c) Reservas estratégicas (el perro que se muerde la cola, como aumenta, compro más para "ahorrarme" los aumentos)

d) Especulación pura y dura.

===

De todos modos, esa "sorpresa" de que el aumento de la energía iba a conducir al aumento de todo el resto de los bienes, se la he visto a MAS DE UN ECONOMISTA.

No estaban preparados para el CAMBIO DE PARADIGMA !!

:-)

Estado: desconectado

Dario_Ruarte

Forum User
Miembro activo
Identificado: 23/09/2005
Mensajes: 999
Perdón... no está de más decir algo TAMBIEN EVIDENTE pero que los economistas tardarán aún unos "días" en descubrir.

Lo que empezaremos a ver es la APROPIACION DE LA RENTA DEL PRODUCTOR por parte de las compañías de energía.

Cómo ?

Vía la ocupación de TODO EL SEGMENTO (integración vertical).

Lo que pronto veremos será a las compañias de energía COMPRANDO CAMPOS y CONTRANTANDO OBREROS A SUELDO FIJO (bajo preferentemente) con ALTA MECANIZACION.

Y, de este modo, Abengoa con 120.000 hectáreas en Brasil, sembrará y cosechará su soja, hará su biodiesel y se quedará con TODA LA RENTA de la cadena de valor.

Eso es lo que verán.

Pero esto lleva a ... el precio de la tierra SKYROCKETEARA (neologismo que quiere decir "subirá como un cohete") porque, ni bien los inmobiliarios se den cuenta, cobrarán el PRECIO DE REFERENCIA y no el actual.

Y así, los U$S 10.000 que actualmente cuesta una buena hectárea SOJERA, se irá a U$S 35.000 como menos.

Ya se habían dado cuenta ?

:-)


Todas las horas son CEST. Hora actual 09:42 .

  • Tópico normal
  • Tópico Pegado
  • Tópico bloqueado
  • Mensaje Nuevo
  • Tópico pegado con nuevo mensaje
  • Tópico bloqueado con nuevo mensaje
  •  Ver mensajes anónimos
  •  Los usuarios anónimos pueden enviar
  •  Se permite HTML
  •  Contenido censurado